Episode 13: Easy Salsa and How to Can!

As summer winds down, it’s time to figure out what to do with all those fruits and veggies you’ve been growing in your garden. There are lots of options: compotes, ice creams, pickles and (the easiest of them all) SALSA! But what’s the point in making all those goodies if you can’t preserve them? Well, we’ll teach you the key steps to proper canning so your end-of-summer treats can last well into winter.

First, the salsa:

Ingredients:

Approximately 5 lbs tomatoes

1 /2-1 onion

1 clove garlic

1 fresh lime (juiced)

2 red peppers

3-4 jalepenos

Salt to taste


Feel free to add or subtract to this recipe as you please! And let us know what you’ve tried, so we can try it out in the future!

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So, salsa is super easy if you have a blender or a food processor. You literally roughly chop all your ingredients and toss them into your device. Then blend until it’s as chunky or as smooth as you desire! Wala! SALSA!

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Now for the tricky part: how to can your yummy salsa. The first step is to get a large stockpot with a thick bottom. Place your mason jars into the stockpot and fill it with water, so the jars are completely covered. Boil them in the hot water for approximately 25 minutes. Then, pour the water out from the jars and place them on the counter to cool. Once they’re at room temperature, pour your salsa into the jars, leaving about 1/4 inch at the top to help create the vaccum. (See an example in the picture above.) Be SUPER careful when taking the jars out of the water. You don’t want to burn yourself!

Once you’ve added your salsa, place the flat lid on top of the jars. Make sure these are NEW. Old ones don’t create the seal that is necessary for safe preservation. Then screw on the ring as tight as you can with your hands. Next, carefully replace the jars in your pot of (still) boiling water. Slowly add hot water until the jars are submerged. Boil for another 25 minutes.

Take the jars out of the boiling water and allow them to cool at room temperature for up to 12 hours. As they cool, they will create a vaccum if you followed these steps and you’ll hear a “POP!” as they seal themselves. Label the jars with the use-by date (usually 6-10 months after you’ve made the goodies) and the contents. Then you’re all set! Enjoy this salsa at your end-of-summer party!

Do you have tips or tricks to canning? We’d love to hear from you! Email us: monsterinmystomach@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @monsterinmysto1

We’ll see you in two weeks!

Episode 12: Blueberry Compote, Food Coloring, Latticework

Pies have the best fillings: fruit, custard, meringue, chocolate, ice cream, etc. Cole’s favorite filling is blueberries, so we’re going to tell you how to make a really flavorful blueberry compote. What’s great about a compote is that it can be canned (more on that next month!) and used in pancakes, on ice cream, in muffins, and all kinds of other foods! This is a very versatile meal component and can be made with any kind of fruit. If you’ve tried any other compotes, let us know: monsterinmystomach@gmail.com.

Ingredients:

4 cups blueberries (we used fresh, frozen is fine)

1/4 cup sugar (completely optional!)

1/4 lemon juice (approximately one freshly squeezed lemon)

1/4 cup basil

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No special tools here! Just a saucepan and a spoon. Just dump everything together into a saucepan and boil until it’s the liquididity you want! Done!

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This is how I like it. Plenty of tasty liquid, but lots of blueberries still to pop in your mouth. When it’s done, just dump it into your pie pan and onto the latticework!

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We added just a little bit of blue food coloring (we use the Wilton gel food coloring) to half of our remaining pie dough from last time. While being careful not to dye our hands we worked it in, then rolled out the dough into a long strip. Using a pizza cutter, we cut the one long strip into four smaller strips and laid them onto the top of the compote. With the non-dyed half of dough, we repeated the process and then wove them together (not really.)

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This is an incredibly easy thing to do, and it looks so pretty when you’re done! Once you’ve woven everything in per our instructions on the podcast, bake the pie for 8 minutes at 375 degrees. Then you’re done!

Do you have tips or tricks on pie fillings or toppings? Tweet at us! @monsterinmysto1

And enjoy this fabulous end of summer treat.

Episode 11: Pie Crust

June marks the beginning of birthday season in the Dyck household. There’s a minimum of one birthday every month until December, and we love to make treats for all our loved ones. In August, we have two special people to bake for: Cole and Daniel. So we’re making Cole’s favorite treat: pie! And, it happens to be something good and summery, to follow up on our Summer of Choux. If you have any tips or tricks on how you make your own pie crust, let us know on Twitter: @monsterinmysto1 or email: monsterinmystomach.com. We’d also love to make YOU a treat! Become our patron and have the option to choose a home-baked goodie from our kitchen. Now, let’s dive in!

NOTE: We are making a double batch. If you’re making a custard pie, use half the ingredients.

Ingredients:

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2 cups flour

1 tsp salt

3/4 cup shortening

Water as needed

Tools:

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If you don’t want to use a fork, use a pastry blender, like the one below! We just don’t happen to have one.

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The steps to making a pie crust are easy and few. First, mix your flour and salt. Then, cut in your shortening. Then, as you continue to mix, add water until you have a nice dough ball.

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Next, separate your dough into two balls and wrap them in cling wrap and set them to chill in the fridge for 30 minutes. During this time, preheat your oven to 425. After 30 minutes, take out one dough ball and roll it out using a rolling pin on a lightly floured surface.

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Once your dough is rolled out to approximately 1/4 of an inch thick, lay it into your pie pan. Make sure you press it down and weigh it down with your pie weights (beans, rice, or ceramic!). Then, you’ll cut your excess dough. Final step is to bake it in the oven for 8 minutes for blind baking. Then remove the pie weights and bake it for another 2-5 minutes if you’re not making a double-crusted pie. Then fill and enjoy!

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What did you put into your pie? Will it be as delicious as our blueberry compote? Let us know, and tune in in two weeks to hear all about making a tasty, tart filling!

Summer of Choux Part 4: Birthday Eclairs

We were so excited to realize that our friend Whitney’s birthday aligned with a recording of this podcast! Whitney loves coffe and desserts, so this was going to be a great birthday surprise! If you’ve tried any of our recipes for a loved one, let us know. Or, if you want to show Whitney some of your own love, consider becoming a patron. For this post, we’re just going to tell you about the coffee glaze, but if you have questions about any of the other steps before we glaze the eclairs please feel free to tweet at us or send us an email!

Coffee Eclairs:

1 batch of creme patissiere (with fresh ground coffe beans instead of a vanilla bean)

1 batch pate a choux

Egg wash (made from egg yolk and water)

White chocolate

Whipping cream

Powdered sugar

More coffee beans

Gold flakes (if you’re fancy)

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This is the actual amount of whipping cream you will need.

This is the actual amount of whipping cream you will need.

After creating your choux, you will pipe it out onto parchment paper in 4 or 5 inch logs. You will bake them at 400 for 5 minutes, then lower the heat to 350 and bake for about 20 minutes, turning halfway through. While they are baking, create your coffee creme patissiere and your glaze.

To create the glaze:

Melt the chocolate and whipping cream in a double boiler, then add the powdered sugar and coffee. Whisk it well, then let it sit at room temperature while you cool your choux pastry and fill it with your pastry cream.

The coffee glaze!

The coffee glaze!

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We still haven’t figured out why our choux won’t rise properly, but these worked just fine for filling. To fill your pastry: gently punch 3 holes in the bottom of the eclair with a piping tip, then fit the tip of your piping bag (or the piping tip that’s in the piping bag) into that hole and squeeze gently until the cream comes out of the hole.

Once you’ve completed that, you will then begin dipping your eclairs in your glaze. Don’t be afraid of this! Just pick up your filled eclair, turn it upside-down, and press them softly, but firmly, into the glaze. We had to wiggle them around a bit to get them evenly covered. Then lift them gently, shaking off the excess, and lay them out to allow the glaze to harden. Once the glaze has hardened, eat it and enjoy!


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And here they are! Happy Birthday Whitney!

Episode 9: Summer of Choux Part 3: Gougeres

Adventures in Choux continue with a success (finally)! We make a wonderful cheese puff, and enjoy all of them all at once. For our listeners at home, we wouldn’t suggest eating all of them, no matter how tasty they are. Let’s get it started! (This post brought to you by Daniel).

Ingredients:

Water

Whole Milk

Sugar (we love the Coconut sugar as always)

Salt

Unsalted Butter, at room temperature

Flour

Eggs (get them good and whisked)

Gruyere Cheese

Ground Black Pepper

Egg Wash (Don’t worry, it’s super easy to make)

Any extra seasonings you think sound really good with cheese

Our Ingredients
Baking Sheet (With Parchment Paper), Medium Sauce Pan, Piping Bag (Which we ended up not using), and Cheese Grater

Baking Sheet (With Parchment Paper), Medium Sauce Pan, Piping Bag (Which we ended up not using), and Cheese Grater

A Basting Brush, and Small Bowl

A Basting Brush, and Small Bowl

Alright, let’s get started! Our first step is to go ahead and shred up some Gruyere, since we’ll be needing that for that whole “cheese” part of our cheese puff. Pictures below give you an idea of how much we used.

Our untouched cheese

Our untouched cheese

Probably enough cheese

Probably enough cheese

Enough cheese for next time, and then some

Enough cheese for next time, and then some

Alright, so we have our cheese! Now we are going to heat up our water, milk, sugar, salt, and butter over medium heat.

Heatin' things up

We’re going to let that get to a simmer, then let it simmer for 3 minutes.

Next we’re going to add in all of our flour. Go ahead and all of it in at once, and start stirring. We’re keeping it on the stove until everything is dried out, and starts looking like mashed potatoes. Once we have the consistancy, our next big important step is to take everything off the heat. Unless you really want scrambled egg Grougeres (I’m sure there is a French word for that, already). Let’s let that sit for a bit, and get our egg wash prepped!

For our egg wash, we’re going to take one egg yolk (just the yolk, it helps with the color) and add water. Whisk that up really well, and you should have a pretty liquidy consistancy, but will stick to our basting brush pretty well. Now lets go check on our mixture that should just about be cooled off.

After about 5 minutes, we should have a mixture that will allow your eggs to be added with no issues. We’re going to be adding the eggs to our mixture in three parts, with lots of stirring in between.

A good look

So now we have our mixture! Now on to baking! You can use a piping bag to make it look really nice. We found the mix to be a lot like biscuits, so we hand-rolled bite-sized balls.

Those are 1”x1” squares, so that should give you an idea of size

Those are 1”x1” squares, so that should give you an idea of size

Baste the balls!

Baste the balls!

  1. After you get done forming the balls, give them a good coating from your egg wash. This is also the time to add any additional seasonings or extra cheese on top. Next up, into the oven they go. We’re going to bake them for only 5 minutes at 400 °F before we reduce the heat. Turn off the oven, let the heat out for a bit, and then we’re bringing the temp down to 350 °F. Bake until golden brown (usually 20ish minutes), take out, and enjoy the smell!

Bon Appetit

These brought back our faith in baking, and shows that practice makes perfect! We have a couple more Choux pastries in store, so hopefully we can keep them tasting this good. See you in a couple of weeks!

Episode 8: Summer of Choux Part 2: Creme Patissiere

This…was also another failure. Our Summer of Choux doesn’t seem to be going so well. It tasted like nothing and the texture was like pudding. But that doesn’t stop us from trying! And we’ll keep going over the next few months until we get choux pastry mastered. Are you ready to join us?

Ingredients:

Whole milk

2 tbsp/1 1/2 tbsp Granulated sugar, divided into two separate measurements as seen in the picture

1/2 vanilla bean, scraped and seeded (or you can try it like we did with vanilla extract. We are genuinely curious if that’s what kept the flavor out)

Egg yolks (that’s just the yellow part, folks!)

Cornstarch

Pinch of salt

Unsalted butter

Your tools!  Super, super easy, this one!

Your tools! Super, super easy, this one!

Ok, first step is to heat the milk with the vanilla (bean) and the larger portion of sugar until it simmers, then cover it and remove it from the heat. Then, separate your egg yolks into a separate bowl and whisk them like Bob Ross thinks the Devil is in them.

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Once you’ve beaten them, add the remaining sugar, the cornstarch and the salt, then whisk some more. Next, you will add the HOT MILK! BE VERY CAREFUL WITH THIS STEP! DO NOT BURN YOURSELF. THE MILK IS VERY HOT.

Here it is, all whisked up!

Here it is, all whisked up!

Once you’ve combined it all, you will put your pot back on medium-low heat and whisk until it starts to thicken and boil (approximately 3 minutes). At this point, you’ll want another bowl with the butter and you’ll add your cream to it. Once you’ve whisked that in and combined it all, if you’ve used the vanilla bean, you’ll want to strain your cream into yet another bowl. We skipped the straining step and put it right into a piping bag.

Remember our mug tip for the piping bag from last time? Use it again! It works even better here than it did with the choux.

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Then you’re ready to pipe in your cream and enjoy your creme puffs! You can put the cream in via two different methods: poking the piping tip through the bottom of the puff and filling it from there, or slicing your puff into two pieces and piping a thick swirl into the middle. We tried both, and liked both, so let us know what you try!

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So, here we are! The end of our second part of our Summer of Choux! It’s going to be a challenging one, but a fun one. Let us know how your summer is going! See you in two weeks.

Episode 7: The Beginning of our Summer of Choux. Pate a Choux!

Oh good lord, everyone. We’re starting to think we can’t quite master this. But that’s why we’re doing a whole summer of it! What is “it”? CHOUX PASTRY! (Pronounced “shoo.”) It’s the dough that makes eclairs and cream puffs, and lots of other yummy goodies. We are horrible at making this, so far. Dive in while you listen to see what went wrong (this time).

Ingredients:

1/4 cup water

Same of Whole millk

1/2 tsp Salt (DO NOT GO BY THE AMOUNT IN THE PICTURE! YOU WILL GET THE SAME HORRIBLE OUTCOME WE DID)

1/2 stick of butter

1/2 cup flour

2 1/2 large eggs (you will have to measure this one)

Vanilla bean pod (we just used our standard 3-second pour of vanilla extract)

Thank you to Betty Hung for her recipe in French Pastry 101

Our ingredients! Everything at room temperature. And DO NOT USE THIS MUCH SALT.

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Our tools! Parchment paper and a baking tray, a sauce pan, a piping bag (or ziplock bag) and piping tip, and a whisk!

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The first step is melting the butter into the milk, water, sugar and vanilla. Do this over medium or lower. You don’t want your milk to burn or curdle. Once it’s bubbling, simmer it for 3 minutes. Then, the whisking begins! Add in the flour and stir until you get a clumpy mess.

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Once it looks like this, you’re going to add your eggs. Your eggs will be pre-whisked, and you will have removed your pan from the direct heat for at least 5 minutes to make sure you don’t scramble your eggs when you add them. Add them in three portions and stir like crazy until they’re completely incorporated. You will then have a custardy mess and you’ll be ready to pipe them!

Follow my tricks about filling your piping bag or ziplock bag and it’ll be an easy process. Also, make sure you’re using a piping tip of 1 1/4 inch or wider, depending on what you want to make.

A nicely filled piping bag!

A nicely filled piping bag!

Now you’re ready to pipe onto the parchment paper! You will see in the picture below the different methods of piping that we played around with, but you will want to do the “drop and squish” method that makes your dough look most like the desired finished product. You’ll understand what I mean when you give it a try. Trust me!





Bottom left is a small, but properly “dropped and squished” puff pastry pre-bake!

Bottom left is a small, but properly “dropped and squished” puff pastry pre-bake!

Our final product! See how lovely that bottom left one turned out? They’re all very small, but at least a few are the right shape. They also tasted HORRIBLE, as we used the wrong amount of salt.

How did yours turn out? Let us know by tweeting at us or e-mailing us! And don’t forget to join our Patreon for the chance to win a fresh-baked goody from us! And stick around for our adventures with choux pastry as we consider to practice it during our Summer of Choux!

Episode 6: Frangipane

Oh, good lord! You’re gonna get a kick out of how to pronounce this one: frah-n-ji-pahn. Frangipane. It’s an almond custard and it tasts soooooo good! We added Pizzazz Apple slices to our tart, just to make it taste even better. Give it a try! It’s easy!

You will need:

Powdered Sugar

Almond Flour

Egg (room temperature)

Butter

Vanilla

Salt (not pictured—just a pinch)

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Frangipane does not require a lot of ingredients, and I think that’s what makes it so special. You’re going to sift all your DRY ingredients together while you beat your butter into a creamy mess. Then, add your dry ingredients to the butter and beat it together, then add the egg and the vanilla. Super easy! (We seriously thought this was going to be the hard part of the tart.)

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Mix, mix, mix!

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This is the perfect, smooth and custard-like consistency you’re looking for. Once it’s here, just pour it into your already blind-baked pie crust (pate sucree is recommended!).

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Once it’s poured in, use a rubber spatula to smooth it out. The smoother the better, if you’re not adding any fruit! (Though why you wouldn’t add more flavor and sugar is beyond me!)

Here, we havecored and sliced our Pizzazz Apples, and laid them out in the fragipane, in a fan-like display. This is apparently the traditional application of pears and apples to a fragipane tart. Once in there, we baked it at 375 degrees for 40 minutes. This was a bit long for us, as you can see in the picture below, so make sure to keep an eye on it.

Hot an fresh out of the oven! At this stage, there is the option to add an apricot glaze, but we didn’t do that. We let the apples shine in all their own glory. Remember to let it rest and cool before you slice into it!

This is so, so good! Doesn’t it look pretty? How did yours turn out? Let us know on Twitter (@monsterinmysto1) or email us: monsterinmystomach@gmail.com. We’ll see you in two weeks!

Episode 5: Pate Sucree

Pate Sucre (pronounced “paht soo-cray”) is a pastry crust similar in texture and flavor to a sugar cookie and is often used as base for fruit pies, frangipane tarts, and other similar pastries. It’s not a flaky crust and is thicker than the crusts we Americans are accustomed to at Thanksgiving dinner. That’s what makes it such a treat! Happy Belated Mother’s Day; let’s dive in!

All Your Ingredients Need To Be At Room Temperature

Butter

All-purpose flour

Powdered Sugar

Salt

Egg

Vanilla Extract

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Here are all the ingredients! Can you figure out the measurements needed?


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Today’s special tools are a stand mixer (you can use a hand mixer, but a stand mixer guarantees a better consistency) with the paddle attachment, cling wrap, and a sifter.


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The butter, in full stick form!

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All creamy! NOW! THIS IS IMPORTANT You want to sift together your SALT and your SUGAR at this step! THEN ADD THAT TO THE BUTTER. Please don’t do what we did! Please!

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Here is our crumbly mess! If yours looks like this, you did it wrong, like we did! But don’t worry! The ending is a sweet surprise!

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These are our tools for the second part of making the pate sucree. (Yes, that IS a cup full of dry rice!)

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Once you’ve added in your flour and mixed it, you want to take it out of the bowl and lay it on a lightly floured surface. You will then squish it into a disk, like this one! This disk shape helps you when you go to roll it out, after it’s chilled. When the time comes to roll it out, use the same floured surface and roll your rolling pin through the flour before you try to roll out your dough.

Also, we lost the picture of our dough all rolled out, but you can see the thickness in the picture below.


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After making it all pretty, blind bake your crust in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Line the inside of your pie crust with parchment paper, then pour in your weights: rice, beans, or baking marbles, then let it cook! Below is a picture of the cookies we made with the pie scraps, so you can get a good idea of the color your crust should be at the end of the blind bake. Check in again in two weeks to learn how to make an amazing filling!


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Episode 4: Brown Butter Almond Tuiles

“Tuiles” (pronounced “too-weals”) are a thin, crispy cookie. Ours turned out chewy, which means we did something wrong, so let us know how yours turned out!

We cannot post the actual recipe for this one, but the ingredients are below:

Unsalted butter

Granulated sugar (we used coconut sugar, again)

Egg whites

Whole Milk

Vanilla

Cake Flour

Salt

Sliced, blanched almonds (these can be found in the baking aisle of the grocery store. You do NOT have to slice or blanch your own almonds.)

Preheat your oven to 324 F or 160 C

You will cook your cookies for 15-18 minutes

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Our special utensils today! A food scale, a rolling pin (ours is sillicone) and a batter scoop.

Today’s cookbook!  We’re on page 33, if you want to see the exact recipe!

Today’s cookbook! We’re on page 33, if you want to see the exact recipe!

Brown butter!  It should smell like nuts and have this froth on top.  If it smells burnt, it’s burnt and will need to be re-made.

Brown butter! It should smell like nuts and have this froth on top. If it smells burnt, it’s burnt and will need to be re-made.

All our wet ingredients!  Don’t worry if yours isn’t quite as brown, as our coconut sugar definitely changes the color of our batter.

All our wet ingredients! Don’t worry if yours isn’t quite as brown, as our coconut sugar definitely changes the color of our batter.

Dry ingredients are in!

Dry ingredients are in!

The first step of folding!  Place the ingredient you’re going to fold onto one side of the bowl, then fold the batter over the ingredient.  Continue that movement, here, until the almonds are completely incorporated.

The first step of folding! Place the ingredient you’re going to fold onto one side of the bowl, then fold the batter over the ingredient. Continue that movement, here, until the almonds are completely incorporated.

Here, Daniel uses the batter scoop to make sure that we get an even distribution of batter per cookie.  The recipe stated that it should make 24 cookies, but it did not.  We got about 18 out of it, using the scoop.    Scoops come in many diffrent sizes, so if you’re seeing a consistent difference in your cookie ratio to the recipe, see if you need to get a smaller cookie scoop.

Here, Daniel uses the batter scoop to make sure that we get an even distribution of batter per cookie. The recipe stated that it should make 24 cookies, but it did not. We got about 18 out of it, using the scoop.

Scoops come in many diffrent sizes, so if you’re seeing a consistent difference in your cookie ratio to the recipe, see if you need to get a smaller cookie scoop.

Here, we are draping the cookies over the rolling pin, so they can keep their slightly curved shape.  We also used cups and a lightsaber immersion blender, because the time in which to get the cookies shaped is very small and our rolling pin couldn’t hold the entire batch of cookies.

Here, we are draping the cookies over the rolling pin, so they can keep their slightly curved shape. We also used cups and a lightsaber immersion blender, because the time in which to get the cookies shaped is very small and our rolling pin couldn’t hold the entire batch of cookies.

The Final Product!!!

The Final Product!!!

Our tuiles did not impress us. They were chewy and salty, which they were not supposed to be, so, for now, we won’t be revisiting this recipe. If you managed to get a different result, let us know what you tried and we might come back and have a Brown Butter Almond Tuiles Part 2! Thanks for listening!

Episode 3: Gourmet Pancakes

This week, we dive into another kind of pancakes: the genuinely home-made kind. Below is our recipe and, as always, pictures to follow along with! Let us know @monsterinmyso1 how they turned out for you!

Recipe:

2 cups flour

2 tblsp baking powder

2 eggs (cold)

2 cups milk (any kind of milk works!)

2 tblsp sugar (we used coconut sugar, as always, due to its lower glycemic index)

Salt (a pinch to a teaspoon—your choice)

3 second vanilla pour (as always)

1/4 cup dried cranberries (fresh fruit is always better, this is just what we had)

Bake in your heavy pan or skillet or griddle at 375 degrees until bubbles appear AND POP in the middle of your pancake. Then flip. Daniel says he waits about 35 seconds on the second side before he takes them off the griddle and serves them up warm! Enjoy!

NOTE: Always add your wet ingredients, then your dry! And it’s after you mix in all your flour that you can then add your extras: chocolate chips, fruit, etc.

Utensils

These are our sifter and our whisk! Super important utensils for proper baking.

Ingredients

Our ingredients! Remember, your eggs can be cold for pancakes!

Adding to the sifter

Adding to the sifter. This can be messy, so it’s best to do it over your mixing bowl.

Sifting

Sifting!

Adding the sugar and salt.

This is proof that we don’t have enough cranberries!

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A quarter cup (1/4 cup) of batter is perfect for our medium-sized-pancakes. Once you feel confident making these, feel free to go bigger or smaller. They even make batter molds so you can make teddy bears or flowers.

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The top pancake on the left has the perfect amount of bubbles! It’s time to flip!

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The top left is the perfect color of brown and the bottom left is ready to flip!

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The perfect cranberry pancakes!

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Time to eat! Remember to tweet @monsterinmysto1 if you have any questions/comments/reccomendations! See you next time!

Episode 2: Pancakes (The Easy Way!)

Because we had two very special guests with us, we went about baking in a bit of a cheat mode: with Bisquick! You can find their recipes on their boxes and their website, though we did change it up by adding a warm egg and my 3-second vanilla pour. However, the pictures below made it worth the cheating! Check back in 2 weeks for an actual home-made pancake recipe.

This is the “oatmeal” part of the process! You really don’t want it to look like oatmeal. Make sure you get out all the lumps.

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Ain was not interested in stirring, but Ebron loved helping out!

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Daniel was right! He saw the perfect number of bubbles. This is the exact coloring you want on your pancakes!

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The finished product! Along with turkey sausage links and cheesey scrambled eggs.

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Ain says, “Dip, dip. Dip, dip!” Into the no-sugar-added applesauce.

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Ebron agrees that the applesauce is a perfect topping.

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After breakfast, the boys had to verify that the audio was worthwhile. Daniel and I agree that spending time with them was worth every moment of poor audio.

See you all in two weeks!

Episode 1: Banana Bread!

Daniel and I take on a very easy recipe in our first episode: banana bread!

Our recipe is made up from a lot of practice and some simple Google searching, but it looks something like this:

Preheat oven to 350

Mash two ripe bananas

Add 3/4 cup of butter, some vanilla and one egg

Mix well

Add your sweetener (we used Splenda) about 3/4 cup

Add 1 tsp baking soda

Add 1 1/2 cups flour

Mix well

Add in nutmeg and cinnamon until you’re happy

Add in chocolate chips to the same degree (we used 1/2 cup of semisweet chocolate chips)

Mix well

Transfer to a bread pan (loaf pan) and bake for 50 minutes.

The pictures below should help with knowing what it should look like. If it doesn’t match perfectly, then you’re fine!

Ingredients

These are all of our ingredients! (Wine was not involved in the making of this bread.)

Mash in a bowl

This was the spatula that broke! But doesn’t that mash look good?

Oven Ready

And here we are! Ready for the oven! Can you smell the cinnamon?

Out of the Oven

Here it is! All done and out of the oven! This is a perfect color for banana bread.

Sliced

Getting ready to slice! We did not wait for it to cool down. You really, really should.

Buttered

And here’s the perfect slice—buttered and ready to eat! Enjoy it however you like it, and remember to subscribe to catch our new episodes, which drop every other Wednesday!